Skrevet av Emne: Training behind bars - T-Nation goes to prison.  (Lest 70577 ganger)

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To veldig underholdene og tøffe artikler fra T-Nation om livet i fengselet. Anbefales på det sterkeste!
Dette er hardcore.

For å starte av stemningen, så siterer jeg en liten del fra del nr. 2:

"The guys told me he mouthed off to one of the coaches during a training session one day. The coach told him not to come back, but he slapped the coach in the face and said he'd return tomorrow. He did return the next day, and other inmates made sure he never returned again. He was beaten with poles and fists and died later that day from his injuries."


Del 1:


http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=970585

Note: The topic of prison training always leads to a heated debate. How do these guys get so big and cut on prison food and with limited training equipment? Sure, they have all day to train, but wouldn't that lead to overtraining?

It's an interesting subject, so instead of guessing about it T-Nation sent contributor and strength coach Zach Even-Esh to a New Jersey prison to find out. (Due to a request by prison officials, we can't tell you its name.) Here's what he learned while on the "inside."

Behind the Walls

I arrived at the prison at 8:30 on a mild February morning. The temperature was about 44 degrees and I was already wondering if I'd see a lot of guys training outside. I also wondered if the inmates were really as tough as everyone said they were. I was about to find out.

When I was a young kid, I remember my dad and I driving by the prison. I had no clue what went on behind the high fences and barbed wire. Things have changed at this New Jersey prison since then. There are now cement walls surrounding those high fences. How the hell anyone can scale those walls is beyond my imagination.

I won't lie; I was nervous just driving up to the place. Last thing I needed was a bunch of jacked inmates telling me how sweet I looked. After all, that's what happens on TV, right?

I pulled into the lot and found my way to the main entrance. I was greeted by a lieutenant who'd been working in the prison for several decades and knew all about its history and the happenings inside. The officers seemed relaxed and I felt less nervous. It was shocking to me how they seemed so easy going in such a hostile environment.

After passing through the metal detector, we waited at the entrance gate for about twenty minutes as inmates passed by heading to their jobs in the field or in the mess hall. There were plenty of big guys walking by. None of these men paid any mind to the officers that stood in the lobby. There didn't seem to be much respect in this instance, but maybe things are different at different times.

You could tell that the majority of the inmates were pumping serious iron. Big upper bodies were the norm. You could see that benching, pull-ups and curls were popular exercises in the jail. Every inmate had a hardened look to him. Their faces were tough, and although some of them were laughing or joking, I could tell they had an edge that the normal guy on the outside didn't have.

A good number stared at me as they passed, but no comments were made. They didn't give a shit what I was there to do or who I was there to see. They did stare at me though, and I understood their silent message: you are a guest in our house. I got the message loud and clear.

Training to Survive

It didn't matter how much wrestling, BJJ, Muay Thai, or any "training" I did. Sure, I go through hard-ass workouts. Sure, I bang heads with tough guys, but there are rules when we spar or compete.

When we're done, we go home and shower in the comfort of our own homes, have a good meal, and make sure we get adequate rest. We don't need to worry too much about someone shanking us on the way to lunch. To these inmates, those of us on the outside are no tougher than the Brady Bunch.

What I did was sport; what these guys did was much different. Referees and rules don't apply when these men go to war. As I was about to learn, lives were won and lost here. In prison, there's a natural food chain that helps keep things in order. This wasn't the movies, and your friends aren't your friends if you do someone wrong.

The lieutenant and I spoke as we waited. He seemed cold and hardened; nothing seemed to surprise or shock him. Murders, beatings, rapes, fighting, gangs, drugs, you name it, his voice remained monotone. It was no different than you and I chatting about sports over a cup of coffee. He said the inmates could easily take this jail over if they wanted to, but there were too many separated groups on the inside and they'd ultimately refuse to work together.

 He pointed out the various wings of the prison and spoke about how some were more "upscale" than others. Some wings were viewed as the ghetto because of the smaller cells, lack of ventilation, and double bunks. When he said "smaller" cells, I had no clue what small really meant until I saw the size of them. My master bath was larger than some of these cells!

I asked how often these guys go outside to train. "If it's raining, they still go out," the lieutenant said. "If there's light snow, they still go out. Things like snowstorms, hurricanes, and temps well below freezing will keep them indoors, but not much else."

Once the inmates all passed by, we were allowed to pass through the security gates. I knew this was going to be an interesting experience and I was charged to see what goes on inside the prison.

The Pile

The first thing I got a look at was the "weight pile." There was a large fan in the wall that I could look through and see the field. I wasn't allowed to head out there because I was told I'd be "fucking killed," even while walking with the lieutenant. I didn't know if they were trying to scare me or if they were serious.

The lieutenant told me that in the past they'd have officers walking out in the field amongst the inmates, but that ended a few years ago to improve safety for the guards. Now they have multiple cameras that are watched from an office, and officers scoping the field from a tower. I wasn't sure if they were armed or not, but I have a funny feeling they were.

I watched as the inmates trained in the weight pile. The "pile" was packed with iron. I was surprised to see so much. It was like Muscle Beach from the Golden Age, only behind bars. There were benches, squat racks, parallel bars, pull-up bars, barbells, dumbbells, and a 400-meter track.

I saw guys benching, squatting, doing dips, pull-ups, and dumbbell military presses. I saw one guy doing seated dumbbell cleans, which were probably their version of heavy side laterals. I was impressed with the amount of equipment out there. I was later told by an inmate that the iron and benches have been there since he arrived, which was 1971!

Cell Training

I was shown the different wings of the prison while the inmates were away. Some small TVs were in a few cells, and some guys had word processors for typing letters. I saw one guy giving haircuts, a few others sweeping the floor, and a few guys carrying bags of food they'd picked up from the commissary. In these bags I saw cereals, soups, Doritos, and tea.

Many of the claustrophobic cells were double bunked and crammed from wall to wall. Some inmates were lucky enough to have a window; others had nothing but a brick wall on every side and a small window through their door. The windows for each wing were opened and the heat was still blasting through.

"Forget about comfort," the lieutenant said, "It's either hot as hell or cold as hell."

I told him what I'd heard from other correction officers about how some prisoners train with trash bags filled with water. He said that the bags weren't allowed in the cells, but some inmates would get them in one way or another and use the water-filled bags for curls. Exercises like handstand push-ups were the norm in the cells, pull-ups off the doorway, and dips using the toilet bowls.

The Big Guy

After touring the wings of the prison, I was introduced to a big fucking dude. They told him I was there to talk to him about training.

I was brought to a small room where an officer sat and watched security monitors. "Wait here," I was told. A few minutes later, that same big dude was brought to the security room and he introduced himself to me. They brought in a chair for him and we sat face to face. He was well respected by the officers and he had a calm demeanor. His size probably made life much easier in prison.

You could tell he didn't screw around with light weights or bodyweight-only training. He was a good six inches taller than me and twice as wide. His forearms were jacked like bowling pins and his arms were busting out of his sleeves. His neck and traps were stretching through his shirt and you could tell those muscles came from years of heavy iron.

I looked like a nerd next to this guy so I knew not to waste his time with stupid questions.

We got started right away by chatting about his daily and weekly routine in the prison. I asked him to tell me about his average day: what he eats, when he wakes up, how he trains each day. He gave me a puzzled look, as if these weren't interesting questions. I was already worried that I'd asked my first stupid question.

The officers stepped in and reiterated that I wanted to know about the "lifting programs" in the prison. He started telling me every detail of his training from Monday through Saturday. He memorized all the weights he used and the exact reps. He was more interested in talking training than nutrition, and I wasn't going to argue with this beast!

He told me he'd been training since age 14. When he got into prison he already weighed 250 pounds and was one of the biggest guys from day one. Currently, at age 42, he weighed in at 280 solid pounds. Looking at him I never would've guessed he was 42. I was told prison ages a person quickly, but I'd pegged him to be 35 or so.

And yes, he's the biggest guy and the strongest guy in the prison, which he stated with no hesitation. He told me how he came from the ghetto and was always into lifting, but all he really did was heavy benching and heavy curls while playing football. He lifted heavy weights from his very first day under the iron. "That's all I knew how to do to protect myself and gain respect," he said.

He told me he never eats in the mess hall where the rest of the inmates eat; instead he gets all his food from the commissary. It had been over eight years since he'd eaten with the rest of the prisoners. He didn't get too detailed about his specific foods, but he mentioned that he made a lot of it in his own cell. He mentioned soups, vegetables with every meal if possible, pasta, and meatballs.

He broke down his training week for me, with Sunday being his only day off. He emphasized how everything was about power, and he didn't decipher between strength and power. I also doubt he would've given two shits if a 225 pound outsider was going to explain it to him. I was there to learn, so I asked questions and listened. He enjoyed talking about training and I started feeling like he didn't chat much with the other guys about it, so this was refreshing for him.

He broke down his weekly program for me with detail. He didn't have a journal; he just remembered it from routine:

Monday: Legs, abs

Tuesday: Chest, tri's, bi's (no direct forearm work)

Wednesday: Deadlifting and back

Thursday: Shoulders

Friday: High rep training for legs and chest

Saturday: Bodyweight-only day plus abs

I took notes sparingly and kept eye contact the entire time. Everything was off the cuff. I just let the conversation flow. He remembered all the weights he used, the exact sets and reps, everything was a system to him now as opposed to his younger days of training with primarily the bench and curls.

He was in favor of doing 4-5 sets of seven reps for most exercises, unless it was one of the three powerlifts. If he was squatting or deadlifting, he was doing sets with rep ranges from 1-7.

Since he competed for the prison powerlifting team as a powerlifter, his goals were to get as strong as possible, period. His lifts were all done with heavy weights. Anything above seven reps to him was a waste of time. Anything that wasn't a basic move was a waste of time.

It was all about heavy squats (front and back), heavy deads from the ground or the rack, seated military presses, heavy shrugs, heavy curls with bars and dumbbells, heavy lying extensions with the straight bar, and heavy rowing. Even his lateral raises were done with 50-80 pounds for sets of seven.

He did reserve Friday for moderate reps and weights in the 8-15 range though. This got me talking about max effort training, repeated effort, dynamic effort, etc. but he didn't know what any of that meant. He looked at me funny and said, "No man, just go heavy." He was a simple man, no complications, no changing rep tempo, and no bullshit.

Countless guys try to train with him he said, but he blows them all away. They hang for two or three weeks and then drop. His workouts are a way of life. He enjoys helping others get strong as well. He wanted to share his knowledge with other inmates if they were up for it, but he mentioned most of them stray away quickly due to the difficulty of his program.

I'd heard about inmates doing Zercher squats and I asked him about it. "No, man," he said, "just squat heavy. There's no reason to do that stuff." He had a Powerlifting USAmagazine so I asked him if he ever heard about Louie Simmons and Westside Barbell. He said, "Yeah, I think so."

I asked about box squatting and he ranted about how unsafe it is to sit on a bench when squatting with 600 or 700 pounds. He talked about crashing down on the bench and herniating discs — same reasons he had for not doing seated military presses. He told me about using 405 on military press for singles and doubles. Was I gonna try and tell this 850 pound squatter how to box squat? No way!

This guy had the run of the weight pile. If he wanted to use a bench, rack, or a pair of dumbbells, he never waited. People went out of their way to help him.

This guy was set in his ways when it came to lifting. He reiterated the use of basics, heavy weights all the time, very little bodyweight training, and training six days a week. If he was helping guys get strong to get them on the powerlifting team, they also trained six days a week. He'd teach them how to squat with only 95 pounds, making sure they went down all the way. He taught them how to breathe and had them do all basic lifts.

He said he preferred to help the shorter guys because they got stronger so much faster than the taller guys. He also mentioned that the shorter guys were more motivated to bulk up to defend themselves in prison.

Even though there was a weightroom indoors, he said he preferred training outside all the time, no matter the weather. The intense heat or freezing weather toughened his mind, and the gym inside didn't have a power rack which is where he spends most of his time.

The benches weren't padded out in the weight pile either. They were made of steel or brick, so having a strong and big back was key to benching out there. He mentioned how the skinny guys were always hurting their backs benching on the brick benches.

When they did decline benching they'd lie upside down on the incline bench and someone would deadlift the bar off the ground to hand it to them each time. He told me how he'd have two guys lifting the weights to him since he would "play" with 500 pounds on the bench.

He said he never went over 500 pounds on the bench for fear of injury. Years ago he felt a slight tear in his chest when he was benching, using weights over 500 pounds for reps. If he benched 515 in a meet he knew he'd always total over 2,100 because of his squat and deadlift being over 800 pounds. He'd also do lying triceps extensions using 225-275 pounds. Again, he'd have a guy deadlift the weight to him each time.

His best lifts in competition meets are:

Squat: 810

Bench: 515

Deadlift: 835

After we chatted for about an hour, my time was up. As big as this guy was, as tough as he was, you could tell he enjoyed helping others. He liked helping the powerlifting team members get better so the team could win. He'd already established himself as the biggest and strongest man to walk that prison. Now his goal seemed to be to maintain that status.

When we left, I asked the lieutenant if any of the inmates ever tried fucking with him. He said a few years ago several guys did and the big powerlifter practically ripped their heads off. He said it was almost as if they were testing him to see if he was as tough as he looked.

He was.



In the next installment, Zach meets a group of lifers with a very different style of training.

Del 2:

http://www.t-nation.com/readArticle.do?id=979600

Note: In Part I, Zach Even-Esh interviewed the biggest, strongest guy in the Jersey prison he visited. In this second installment, he meets a group of lifers and learns about their style of athletic training. He also learns what happens when you slap your prison boxing coach. Hint: Don't slap your prison boxing coach. Ever.


The Lifers

I was told I was going to be brought up to meet "the lifers." I was wondering what the heck else I'd learn after the last conversation. I assumed I might hear the same stuff, possibly more information on bodyweight training. I was wrong. I was about to learn more about prison life and more about training for boxing, sanity, and what you do to stay alive in prison.

I met the lifers upstairs, near the indoor gym. The gym had a basketball court and a weight area. The weight area was pretty cool. The heavy barbells had the weights welded on, making them fixed weight. The inmates called the skinny bars "pig iron." The benches were made of steel, even the preacher bench.

A few of the corrections officers were working out on a heavy bag and doing some curls. I was surprised to see that the majority of these guys didn't look very physical. I was told that there were a few serious officers who were pretty jacked up, but I didn't see any during my visit.

When I met the lifer's, we all sat down together and started talking about my previous conversation with the "big guy." They were against this style of training – going heavy all the time and being too big to move your body athletically. A few of these guys were former members of the prison boxing team. They took pride in this, but unfortunately the boxing team no longer exists. The gym I'd just seen used to have a ring and a few boxing coaches.

They rattled off endless names of boxers who were in the prison and got out, some making it into the pro ranks, others getting murdered out in the streets, and some ending up back in prison again.

They said being on the boxing team wasn't open to anyone. The team members would get a special jacket and they wore it with pride. Inmates who tried to join the boxing team to learn some fighting skills to use against others were quickly removed from the team, sometimes with force.

They called the weight training done at the weight pile "jail house training." Things like benching while bouncing the bar off the chest wasn't impressive to these guys. Doing heavy seated military presses with a big arch in the back was no different than incline benching, they said. These guys emphasized strict form in all their movements. They called their style of training "natural training."

They started asking me how I train my own athletes and they loved the idea of using tire flips, sledgehammer work, and sandbags. They spoke about how Muhammad Ali used sledgehammers for his training.

These guys loved talking about boxing. Their boxing coach would have them do circuit training using any skill or implement they had available to them. Each skill or tool was used for three minute rounds. The circuit was repeated twice:

sparring
speed bag
heavy bag
jumping rope
running the stairs holding a 20 pound medicine ball

Sometimes they'd run with the heavy bag, doing laps around the basketball court. If they were allowed to use weights, they did benching for high reps and light curls using 15 pounds. Sometimes they'd do shadow boxing with these 15 pound dumbbells as well.

They became enthralled in the discipline behind boxing. The coaches instilled in them hard work and dedication, not just using boxing for starting problems in the prison. If they did use their boxing in such a negative manner, they were off the team.

They'd take a pillowcase and wrap up a few T-shirts inside of it, hanging this in their cell and using it as a speed bag for extra training. Bodyweight exercises were the norm for these guys, doing sets of 50 push-ups scattered throughout the day. Now that there's no boxing team, one of the guys said he still has to do his 5 x 50 push-ups every morning or his day just isn't right.

His day would start at slightly before five in the morning, cranking out various push-ups, shadow boxing, pull-ups, dips off his toilet bowl, and isometric training. His isometrics included doing military presses with his hands on the doorway, as well as isometrics of side laterals inside the doorway.

He had guys that were cleaning the floors bring him buckets and the sticks from the mops.  He'd hang the buckets off the stick to do curls. When they went outdoors, they did pull-ups (weighted and non-weighted), dips, sit-ups, used the ab wheel on the dirt, and ran "wind sprints" on the track going forward and backward.

Sometimes they'd run for the entire hour on the track holding a 20-pound dumbbell behind their neck. The boxing team was allowed to wake up early and get to the field before the inmates and before breakfast so they could train.

These inmates had immense respect for their coaches. Respect wasn't a word to be used loosely either. They told me about a big guy who came up to the gym to start boxing. He'd skip training sessions regularly and talk trash about his skills in and out of the ring.

The guys told me he mouthed off to one of the coaches during a training session one day. The coach told him not to come back, but he slapped the coach in the face and said he'd return tomorrow. He did return the next day, and other inmates made sure he never returned again. He was beaten with poles and fists and died later that day from his injuries.

Prison Newbies

I asked what the younger inmates do to keep out of trouble when they get to the prison. I assumed that being 18 or 19 and walking into one of the most feared prisons in the state would scare these kids shitless. These guys said, "Shit, these young fucking kids are the laziest motherfuckers. All they wanna do is smoke weed, if they can get some!"

"They come in here from street gangs thinking they're all tough and shit. They try fuckin' with the older guys who've been here for 20 or 25 years because they think they can get an edge on these guys. These guys don't want any trouble with anyone. So these young kids end up getting killed."

I asked about the inmates in general, and if they had to lift weights to gain some sort of an edge in the prison. "You never know why some guys lift weights," one lifer said.  "Some guys can be all pumped up but they might like to take dick. So you never know why the fuck some of these guys work out!"

Another lifer piped up, "Some guys work out in the hot summer and then I tell them they need to take a shower. I tell them that shit isn't healthy to walk around sweaty all day and not shower. These guys are scared of getting raped here. I admit, I'm a man and I have my needs, but if you don't wanna take dick in prison, you're not gonna take dick! I don't care if motherfuckers are coming after me with chainsaws, I'll fight all them motherfuckers and they're gonna have to kill me if they want me to take dick!"

Eating & Training for Survival

They started asking me questions about glutamine, green tea, creatine, vitamins, and nutrition. They had a FLEX magazine there and they'd been reading all the ads about various supplements.

A few of the guys drank green tea on a regular basis, usually a few times a day. They weren't sure if they felt charged up from glutamine and creatine or if it was all in their heads. I explained to them what placebo effect was and they were excited about the new exchange of information.

When they spoke about nutrition they mentioned how they would eat "light," sometimes skipping a meal such as breakfast or lunch. They said eating is what determined how they'd perform. If they ate heavy, they moved sluggishly.

It was interesting to see how there were two schools of thought that day. One guy wanted to use big weights and nothing else. The other guys were all about using their own body for training. To them, being able to train in the weight pile was a privilege, not a right. They wanted to always be able to train effectively using only body weight, just in case the weights were taken away from them.

They told me that after all the years of training they now understand why they do it. Training is their meditation and their own form of therapy. Without their morning push-ups, the day just never went well. They'd be angry and on edge, but the training took that away from them and helped them maintain some sanity. They kept going back to their days of boxing and how grateful they were for the boxing coaches who educated them and helped them grow into better men.

The time flew by as we chatted. These guys were laughing at some of these stories, got a bit emotional over some of them, and told me how much they enjoyed our conversation. It was about time for them to head to lunch, so before they left they brought me back to the gymnasium.

They reminisced about where the boxing ring was, showed me where they'd run stairs for conditioning, and then off we went. We all walked down to the main walkway where everyone was heading to lunch, the field, or their job.

On the Outside Again

Finally, after four hours on the inside, I was on my way home. The visit was awesome and I had a blast talking with these guys. I felt a bit shitty after leaving though because the guys I spoke with were cool. These conversations easily could've been over some steak and beers at a good restaurant.

Call me human; call me a pussy. I don't really care. Going behind the walls of this prison was an eye-opener to say the least. Lessons in lifting and lessons in life were learned here. These guys had some shitty conditions in this "human jungle" and they were making the best of their situation.

And maybe that's something we can all learn from.

About the Author

Zach Even-Esh is a strength and performance coach for Combat Athletes located in NJ. For more info on Zach's methods, visit www.UndergroundStrengthCoach.com or www.ZachEven-Esh.com.

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Utlogget Prodigy92

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Fy faen så jævlig bra lesing! Honnær til deg!

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Bra lesning! I Norge er det varierende muligheter for trening for de innsatte. Jeg har selv jobbet som betjent i fengsel og holdningen er den at man ikke ønsker å skape "torpedoer" bak murene og det er også sagt at sterke innsatte gjør jobben vanskeligere og mer utrygg for betjentene...
Education is important, but big biceps are importanter.

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Sikkert en stor kamp for å overleve i fengselet ja. Smiley
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Bra lesestoff! honnør! Smiley

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Sv: Training behind bars - T-Nation goes to prison.
« #5 : 25. juli 2009, 21:58 »
Veldig interessant! Smiley
>.<
- Work hard or don't work at all..

Vgar goes Snekker Andersen; http://www.treningsforum.no/forum/index.php?topic=87149.msg1264656;topicseen#new

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Sv: Training behind bars - T-Nation goes to prison.
« #6 : 06. september 2009, 21:29 »
Bra lesning! I Norge er det varierende muligheter for trening for de innsatte. Jeg har selv jobbet som betjent i fengsel og holdningen er den at man ikke ønsker å skape "torpedoer" bak murene og det er også sagt at sterke innsatte gjør jobben vanskeligere og mer utrygg for betjentene...

Hei, åssen arbeidstider er det som fengselsbetjent?
Stats:                      
Høyde - 176cm         
Vekt - 180 pounds of muscle, steel and sex appael! ^^
Alder - 26.08.89

Beste løft: (film - "Danielsel" youtube)
Benkpress: 145kg (@ 82kg, 19år -skade) (137,5@17år)
Styrkevending: 125kg
Frontbøy: 150kg
Markløft: 200kg
Push press: 106kg*2 (fra bakken og opp)

TRENINGSLOGG: Litt av alt.
http://www.treningsforum.no/forum/index.php?topic=89118.0

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Sv: Training behind bars - T-Nation goes to prison.
« #7 : 06. september 2009, 21:32 »
Turnus
altså skiftarbeid

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Sv: Training behind bars - T-Nation goes to prison.
« #8 : 06. september 2009, 22:42 »
Turnus
altså skiftarbeid

ok, kjipt. Høres interresangt ut. Men har lite lyst å jobbe kveldsvat / tidlig vakt om hverandre Tongue fucker opp døgnrytmen og rutiner helt.
Stats:                      
Høyde - 176cm         
Vekt - 180 pounds of muscle, steel and sex appael! ^^
Alder - 26.08.89

Beste løft: (film - "Danielsel" youtube)
Benkpress: 145kg (@ 82kg, 19år -skade) (137,5@17år)
Styrkevending: 125kg
Frontbøy: 150kg
Markløft: 200kg
Push press: 106kg*2 (fra bakken og opp)

TRENINGSLOGG: Litt av alt.
http://www.treningsforum.no/forum/index.php?topic=89118.0

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Sv: Training behind bars - T-Nation goes to prison.
« #9 : 06. september 2009, 23:02 »
hehe, det er nok ikke slik det funker.
det er regler for hvordan turnus legges opp søvnmessig osv.

perfekt hvis du liker å styre egen fritid og legge opp til konkurranser osv..

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Sv: Training behind bars - T-Nation goes to prison.
« #10 : 06. september 2009, 23:06 »
aha.. men "må" man jobbe nattevakt f.eks? eller kan man bare holde seg til morgen og kvelds vakter?: )


Er jo veldig fint opplegg med utdanninga til fengselsbetjent.
Stats:                      
Høyde - 176cm         
Vekt - 180 pounds of muscle, steel and sex appael! ^^
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Beste løft: (film - "Danielsel" youtube)
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http://www.treningsforum.no/forum/index.php?topic=89118.0

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Sv: Training behind bars - T-Nation goes to prison.
« #11 : 07. september 2009, 20:25 »
aha.. men "må" man jobbe nattevakt f.eks? eller kan man bare holde seg til morgen og kvelds vakter?: )


Er jo veldig fint opplegg med utdanninga til fengselsbetjent.
Det er vel bare fengselsdirektøren og andre i kontorjobb som jobber på dagtid, lite mulighet for å få en spesialtilpasset turnus... Arbeidsgiver har behov for folk som er fleksible ang arbeidstid.

Men det er nattarbeidet som gir penger i kassa! Helger og helligdager gir fet uttelling Wink
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Sv: Training behind bars - T-Nation goes to prison.
« #12 : 07. september 2009, 22:42 »
aha.. men "må" man jobbe nattevakt f.eks? eller kan man bare holde seg til morgen og kvelds vakter?: )


Er jo veldig fint opplegg med utdanninga til fengselsbetjent.
Ingen grunn til å ta sorgene på forskudd... du må først komme inn på skolen og bli utdannet før du trenger bekymre deg.
Det er ca 10 søkere pr stilling på fengselsskolen, så kampen er passe hard.. snittalder på 30 år.

Nattvakter er engentlig gull, forresten. Både økonomisk og spise-messig! Smiley

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